Rio 2016 Apps

Enhance your Games experience.

Download
Who are you cheering on?

Who are you cheering on?

Choose your favorite athletes, teams, sports and countries by clicking on the buttons next to their names

Note: Your favourites settings are stored on your computer through Cookies If you want to keep them, refrain from clearing your browser history

Please set your preferences

Please check your preferences. You can change them at any time

Expand Content

This time zone applies to all schedule times

Expand Content
Contrast
Original colours Original colours High contrast High contrast
View all acessibility resources
A new world

Synchronised Swimming

Buy Tickets Here
An aquatic ballet, synchronised swimming has been delighting Olympic audiences with its grace and rhythm since Los Angeles 1984. It’s a women-only discipline with duet and team competitions.
Spectator's Guide - Synchronised Swimming
  • Synchronised Swimming

Countries

Athletes

Events

24 104 2

Schedule & Results

Schedule & Results

Synchronised Swimming

Select the time zone:
Rio Time
My time zone
August21
Date Event Status

About

About

Aim of the game

Essentially pool-based gymnastics, teams of swimmers perform choreographed moves on and under the water to a musical soundtrack, with judges giving scores based on a wide range of criteria

Why should you watch this?

This is both spectacle and sport, combining dance and swimming in perfectly timed, astonishingly graceful rhythmic movements, whilst demanding huge levels of stamina and lung capacity

International Federation

Olympic debut

Los Angeles 1984

Rules
  • Cadence action

    Cadence action

    Identical moves made by each of the swimmers in sequence

  • Boost

    Boost

    Rising rapidly out of the water head first

  • Ballet leg

    Ballet leg

    Floating on the back with one leg raised perpendicular to the surface of the water

Impress your friends

  • Despite being an exclusively female discipline, it was men who first performed acrobatics in the water at the end of the 19th century

    Despite being an exclusively female discipline, it was men who first performed acrobatics in the water at the end of the 19th century

  • Women gradually took over the sport, their lighter frames enabling them to make more intricate moves

    Women gradually took over the sport, their lighter frames enabling them to make more intricate moves

  • Russia confirmed its dominance of the sport by winning both golds at London 2012 – since Sydney 2000, Russians have won every synchronised swimming Olympic gold medal available

    Russia confirmed its dominance of the sport by winning both golds at London 2012 – since Sydney 2000, Russians have won every synchronised swimming Olympic gold medal available

  • One of the symbols of Russian dominance is Svetlana Romashina, owner of three Olympic golds – and she will be just 26 at Rio 2016

    One of the symbols of Russian dominance is Svetlana Romashina, owner of three Olympic golds – and she will be just 26 at Rio 2016

  • Twins Karen and Sarah Josephson (USA) and Penny and Victoria Vilagos (Canada) won gold and silver at Barcelona 1992 – Brazilian twins Bia and Branca Feres also compete together

    Twins Karen and Sarah Josephson (USA) and Penny and Victoria Vilagos (Canada) won gold and silver at Barcelona 1992 – Brazilian twins Bia and Branca Feres also compete together

  • Women swimmers have to leave vanity in the changing room, with make-up and hairstyles strictly regulated and swimming costumes worn rather than bikinis, not to mention the nose-clips

    Women swimmers have to leave vanity in the changing room, with make-up and hairstyles strictly regulated and swimming costumes worn rather than bikinis, not to mention the nose-clips

Routines

Swimmers perform two routines, one that is more technically challenging and based on a list of compulsory moves, and another with few restrictions, assessed purely on choreography, interpretation and skill.

Technical routines: duets can last 2 minutes and 20 seconds, whereas the teams have 2 minutes and 50 seconds.

Free routine: duets can last three minutes, while teams have four minutes.

For team performances, each country must register nine swimmers, but only eight will take part in the competition.

Scoring

At the end of each performance, three panels of judges assess the swimmers’ technical and artistic abilities. The highest and lowest marks are discarded and the remainder added together to arrive at the routine’s final score. Adding together the marks for the two routines gives the final score.

Points are lost for taking too long to get into the pool, touching the bottom and not completing the compulsory moves in the technical routine.

Music

The pool is fitted with speakers so that the swimmers can hear the music, even under water.

Stats

Top Medalists

Women
RUS
Anastasia Davydova
5 0 0 5
JPN
Miya Tachibana
0 4 1 5
JPN
Miho Takeda
0 4 1 5

Countries

Athletes

Athletes & Teams

Gender

Gender
Woman 100
Men 0
Women
Men

Age Range

Age Range
Under 15 0
16 - 20 22
21 - 25 49
26 - 30 25
31 - 40 4
Over 40 0
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • J
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W
  • X
  • Y
  • Z