Rio 2016 Apps

Enhance your Games experience.

Download
Who are you cheering on?

Who are you cheering on?

Choose your favorite athletes, teams, sports and countries by clicking on the buttons next to their names

Note: Your favourites settings are stored on your computer through Cookies If you want to keep them, refrain from clearing your browser history

Please set your preferences

Please check your preferences. You can change them at any time

Expand Content

This time zone applies to all schedule times

Expand Content
Contrast
Original colours Original colours High contrast High contrast
View all acessibility resources
A new world

Shooting

Buy Tickets Here
A supreme test of accuracy and nerves, shooting made its Paralympic debut at the Toronto 1976 Games. In Rio, competitors will take aim for 12 individual gold medals using four types of guns, with men’s, women’s and mixed events.
Spectator's Guide - Shooting

About

About

Aim of the game

Competitors with different levels of disability have to hit targets in order to score more points than their opponents

Why should you watch this?

A remarkable display of concentration and precision, men and women compete head-to-head under the same conditions, testing their nerve as well as their aim

International Federation

IPC

Paralympic debut

Toronto 1976

Rules
  • Firing point

    Firing point

    Position from which competitors shoot

  • Shoot-off

    Shoot-off

    A tie-break situation that occurs when two or more competitors’ scores are level

  • Sighting shots

    Sighting shots

    Warm-up shots that are fired prior to match shots to check that the gun’s sights are correctly adjusted

Impress your friends

  • The development of Paralympic shooting began in Scotland in the 1970s

    The development of Paralympic shooting began in Scotland in the 1970s

  • Women took part in Paralympic shooting for the first time in the mixed events at the Arnhem 1980 Games, and women-only events featured for the first time at the Atlanta 1996 Games

    Women took part in Paralympic shooting for the first time in the mixed events at the Arnhem 1980 Games, and women-only events featured for the first time at the Atlanta 1996 Games

  • At Atlanta 1996, South Africa’s Rosabelle Riese became the first and so far only African shooter to win a Paralympic Games medal, taking bronze in the SH1 class 10m air pistol

    At Atlanta 1996, South Africa’s Rosabelle Riese became the first and so far only African shooter to win a Paralympic Games medal, taking bronze in the SH1 class 10m air pistol

  • At the London 2012 Games, China’s Cuiping Zhang was the only woman to win a medal in the mixed events, taking bronze in the SH1 class prone air rifle event

    At the London 2012 Games, China’s Cuiping Zhang was the only woman to win a medal in the mixed events, taking bronze in the SH1 class prone air rifle event

  • Swede Jonas Jacobsson has the most Paralympic shooting medals (30, including 17 golds) won at nine Games during which Sweden dominated the sport with 48 medals

    Swede Jonas Jacobsson has the most Paralympic shooting medals (30, including 17 golds) won at nine Games during which Sweden dominated the sport with 48 medals

  • Britain’s Matt Skelhon holds three Paralympic shooting medals (gold, silver and bronze) as well as the world record for the SH1 50m rifle event

    Britain’s Matt Skelhon holds three Paralympic shooting medals (gold, silver and bronze) as well as the world record for the SH1 50m rifle event

  • Shooting had 29 different events at Los Angeles 1984 and 142 competitors at Athens 2004

    Shooting had 29 different events at Los Angeles 1984 and 142 competitors at Athens 2004

  • The bullseye on the air rifle target, worth 10 points, is only half a millimetre in diameter

    The bullseye on the air rifle target, worth 10 points, is only half a millimetre in diameter

Events

The athlete’s position is either standing, sitting or ‘prone’ (lying on their front) and 10m, 25m or 50m from the target, depending on the event. Class SH2 competitors are allowed to use supports for their weapons.

In each event, competitors take a specific number of shots at the target in a set period: 40 shots in women’s 10m air pistol and 10m air rifle standing, 120 in men’s 50m rifle three positions and 60 in the remaining events. The objective is to hit the bullseye of the electronic target, worth 10 points, with the concentric rings outside the centre scoring from nine to one.

Each event has a qualification round, from which the eight best shooters proceed to the final. In the final, each of the 10 target rings is divided into 10 sections, allowing athletes to achieve scores from 1.0 to 10.9.

25m pistol

In the 25m pistol final, only ‘hits’ or ‘misses’ are counted, with the 10.2 zone being the target.

Stats

Top Medalists

Men
swe
Jonas Jacobsson
16 1 8 25
ger
Franz Falke
2 4 3 9
ned
Eef Tammel
3 2 3 8
Women
aus
Elizabeth Kosmala
8 3 0 11
kor
Im Yeon Kim
5 3 1 9
gbr
Deanna Coates
3 3 2 8