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A new world

Sailing

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In the Paralympic Games all sailing events are mixed, with men and women competing together in the same regattas. The sport became part of the Games at Sydney 2000. In Rio, there are boats for one, two and three sailors.
Spectator's Guide - Sailing
  • Sailing

Countries

Athletes

Events

23 80 3

Schedule & Results

Schedule & Results

Sailing

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September18
Date Event Status

About

About

Aim of the game

Powered only by the wind, sailing boats crewed by athletes with physical, motor and visual impairments must navigate the designated course faster than their opponents

Why should you watch this?

For the excitement of cheering on your favourite sailors in an event that brings men and women into direct competition at the mercy of the same conditions in the unpredictable waters of the beautiful Guanabara Bay

International Federation

Paralympic debut

Sydney 2000

Rules
  • Leeward

    Leeward

    Side protected from the wind

  • Windsock

    Windsock

    Equipment used to indicate the wind direction

  • Windward

    Windward

    Side of the boat blown by the wind

Impress your friends

  • The first international sailing competition for disabled athletes took place in Switzerland in the 1980s

    The first international sailing competition for disabled athletes took place in Switzerland in the 1980s

  • Before its formal introduction to the Paralympic programme at the Sydney 2000 Games, sailing was an exhibition sport at Atlanta 1996

    Before its formal introduction to the Paralympic programme at the Sydney 2000 Games, sailing was an exhibition sport at Atlanta 1996

  • At the Sydney 2000 Games, Australia’s Noel Robins, Jamie Dunross, Graeme Martin and Germany’s Heiko Kroeger, became the first ever Paralympic sailing champions

    At the Sydney 2000 Games, Australia’s Noel Robins, Jamie Dunross, Graeme Martin and Germany’s Heiko Kroeger, became the first ever Paralympic sailing champions

  • Competing against 15 men at the London 2012 Games, Britain’s Helena Lucas became the first woman to win gold in the 2.4mR class

    Competing against 15 men at the London 2012 Games, Britain’s Helena Lucas became the first woman to win gold in the 2.4mR class

  • Dutch sailor Udo Hessels is the only athlete to take part in four consecutive Paralympic sailing competitions, as well as the exhibition spot at the Atlanta 1996 Games

    Dutch sailor Udo Hessels is the only athlete to take part in four consecutive Paralympic sailing competitions, as well as the exhibition spot at the Atlanta 1996 Games

  • With a gold and two silver medals in the Sonar class, Germany’s Jens Kroker is the only sailor in the world to hold three Paralympic sailing medals

    With a gold and two silver medals in the Sonar class, Germany’s Jens Kroker is the only sailor in the world to hold three Paralympic sailing medals

  • Paralympic sailing boats are designed for greater stability and are more spacious to allow the crew to move around more easily

    Paralympic sailing boats are designed for greater stability and are more spacious to allow the crew to move around more easily

  • Bruno Landgraf, Brazil’s SKUD 18 representative at the London 2012 Games, was a professional goalkeeper until he suffered a serious car accident that left him tetraplegic

    Bruno Landgraf, Brazil’s SKUD 18 representative at the London 2012 Games, was a professional goalkeeper until he suffered a serious car accident that left him tetraplegic

Regattas

Two boats take up position at either end of an imaginary starting line. The course is defined by buoys placed at regular intervals on the water.

In a sport dictated by the wind, competitors need to adapt to the climatic and sailing conditions if they are to win.

Scoring

Competitions consist of a series of races from which sailors are awarded points depending on their finishing positions, one for first, two for second and so on. The top ten then compete in a final medal race, worth double the number of points, with the winner having the lowest points total at the end.

Boats

2.4mR

A single-hull, dual-sail, one-person boat, 4.16m long and weighing 260 kg. Made its debut at the Sydney 2000 Paralympic Games.

SKUD 18

A single-hull, three-sail, two-person boat, 5.8m long and weighing around 400kg. Made its debut at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Sonar

A single-hull, two-sail, three-person boat, 7m long and weighing almost a ton. Made its debut at the Sydney 2000 Paralympic Games.

Classification

Sailors are classified from 1 to 7: the lower the number, the more severe the impairment. The system allows athletes with different impairments to compete together. Sailors compete individually or in crews of two or three.

A three-person team’s combined total cannot exceed 14.  In the two-person event, one sailor must be classified 1 or 2, and one must be female.

Stats

Top Medalists

Men
ger
Jens Kroker
1 2 0 3
aus
Daniel Fitzgibbon
1 1 0 2
ned
Udo Hessels
1 1 0 2
Women
gbr
Helena Lucas
1 0 0 1
aus
Liesl Tesch
1 0 0 1
usa
Maureen McKinnon Tucker
1 0 0 1

Countries

Athletes

Athletes & Teams

Gender

Gender
Woman 19
Men 81
Women
Men

Age Range

Age Range
Under 15 0
16 - 20 1
21 - 25 5
26 - 30 16
31 - 40 20
Over 40 58
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