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A new world

Judo

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Ippon, wazari, yuko... the successful delivery of a single move can swing the match. Contested by visually impaired athletes, judo made its Paralympic Games debut at Seoul 1988. In Rio there will be seven weight categories for men and six for women.
Spectator's Guide - Judo
  • Judo

About

About

Aim of the game

Competitors must try to throw their opponent onto the ground with their back on the floor, immobilise them on the ground for 20 seconds or force a submission

Why should you watch this?

Bouts are crammed full of skill, strength and drama – with one move, a judoka can turn a fight around in a split second

International Federation

Paralympic debut

Seoul 1988

Rules
  • Hajime!

    Hajime!

    The call heard before each bout – it is the command “start!” in Japanese, given by the referee

  • Judogi

    Judogi

    The judo uniform: jacket and trousers of thick cloth

  • Matte!

    Matte!

    This command tells the judokas to temporarily stop fighting and return to their initial positions

Impress your friends

  • The sport started to be widely practised around the world in the 1970s and gained strength and popularity until it entered the Seoul 1988 Paralympic Games

    The sport started to be widely practised around the world in the 1970s and gained strength and popularity until it entered the Seoul 1988 Paralympic Games

  • At the Athens 2004 Paralympic Games, women’s competitions were added to the judo programme

    At the Athens 2004 Paralympic Games, women’s competitions were added to the judo programme

  • The first Paralympic Games medal in judo was won by 16-year-old Simon Jackson at Seoul 1988. The Briton would also win gold at Barcelona and Atlanta

    The first Paralympic Games medal in judo was won by 16-year-old Simon Jackson at Seoul 1988. The Briton would also win gold at Barcelona and Atlanta

  • Two weeks before the London 2012 Games, the Republic of Korea's Gwang-Geun Choi was in hospital recovering from a leg operation. He won gold in the -100kg category

    Two weeks before the London 2012 Games, the Republic of Korea's Gwang-Geun Choi was in hospital recovering from a leg operation. He won gold in the -100kg category

  • Brazil’s Antônio Tenório, a four-time Paralympic champion and London 2012 bronze medallist, will be seeking his sixth consecutive medal in Rio

    Brazil’s Antônio Tenório, a four-time Paralympic champion and London 2012 bronze medallist, will be seeking his sixth consecutive medal in Rio

  • Spain’s Maria del Carmen Herrera Gomez has not lost a bout in three Paralympic Games, and she will be out to win a fourth consecutive gold in Rio

    Spain’s Maria del Carmen Herrera Gomez has not lost a bout in three Paralympic Games, and she will be out to win a fourth consecutive gold in Rio

  • Judo is the only martial art in the Paralympic programme and was the first sport of Asian origin to be included in the Games

    Judo is the only martial art in the Paralympic programme and was the first sport of Asian origin to be included in the Games

  • Japan and China share the record for the most gold medals (4) at an edition of the Paralympic Games, winning their hauls at Seoul 1988 and Beijing 2008, respectively

    Japan and China share the record for the most gold medals (4) at an edition of the Paralympic Games, winning their hauls at Seoul 1988 and Beijing 2008, respectively

  • B1 class judokas, who are totally blind, are identified by a red circle on the sleeves of their kimonos. They must be led by referee to tatame's mark for the fight to resume

    B1 class judokas, who are totally blind, are identified by a red circle on the sleeves of their kimonos. They must be led by referee to tatame's mark for the fight to resume

Stats

Top Medalists

Men
bra
Antônio Tenório
4 0 1 5
JPN
Satoshi Fujimoto
3 1 0 4
GBR
Simon Jackson
3 0 1 4
Women
GER
Ramona Brussig
2 1 0 3
RUS
Tatiana Savostyanova
0 1 2 3
ESP
Maria del Carmen Herrera
2 0 0 2