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A new world

Golf

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This is a historic moment for golf: after 112 years, it is again an Olympic sport. Before that, it was part of the programme only in Paris 1900 and St Louis 1904. In Rio, men and women will compete individually on the new Olympic Golf Course.
Spectator's Guide - Golf
  • Golf

Countries

Athletes

Events

41 120 2

Schedule & Results

Schedule & Results

Golf

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August21
Date Event Status

About

About

Aim of the game

Players use a selection of clubs to get their ball from the teeing ground into a hole in the fewest number of shots possible – the player who completes the 18-hole course with the lowest shot total wins the round

Why should you watch this?

In Rio, the world's best golfers will be part of the Olympic Games for the first time in more than a century, and the lure of a gold medal is sure to attract the sport's biggest names

International Federation

IGF

Olympic debut

Paris 1900

Rules
  • Chip

    Chip

    A short shot onto the green using an open-faced club to pop the ball up into the air and on to the putting surface

  • Drive

    Drive

    The most powerful shot in golf, using the biggest wood called a 'driver'

  • Hole-in-one

    Hole-in-one

    The famously rare feat of getting the ball in the hole straight from the tee shot, usually only possible on shorter par 3 or 4 holes

Impress your friends

  • Golf began in Scotland in the Middle Ages, but the game was initially banned by King James II for interfering with archery practice

    Golf began in Scotland in the Middle Ages, but the game was initially banned by King James II for interfering with archery practice

  • In 1744, the rules of the game were established and 10 years later the Society of St Andrews Golfers, home to one of the most famous courses in the world, was formed

    In 1744, the rules of the game were established and 10 years later the Society of St Andrews Golfers, home to one of the most famous courses in the world, was formed

  • Golf was first played at the Olympic Games in Paris in 1900, only to be removed after 1904 – it returns in 2016 after more than a century's absence

    Golf was first played at the Olympic Games in Paris in 1900, only to be removed after 1904 – it returns in 2016 after more than a century's absence

  • At the St Louis 1904 Games, 80 players took to the course – 77 Americans and three Canadians – with Toronto native George Lyon upsetting the odds to win gold

    At the St Louis 1904 Games, 80 players took to the course – 77 Americans and three Canadians – with Toronto native George Lyon upsetting the odds to win gold

  • On 6 February 1971, golf was played on the moon when US astronaut Alan Shepherd exited Apollo 14 and hit a 6-iron shot

    On 6 February 1971, golf was played on the moon when US astronaut Alan Shepherd exited Apollo 14 and hit a 6-iron shot

Format

A competition golf course consists of 18 holes of varying length and is played four times during a championship.

Course

Length: the normal championship course length is approximately 7,000 yards.

Tee: a designated area from where the first shot of each hole is played.

Fairway: the ideal route from the tee to the green, where the grass is cut shorter thus making it easier to play shots.

Green:  the area around the hole where the grass is shortest and players use a putter to hit the ball.

Flag or pin: indicates where the hole is.

Hole or Cup: what the ball must fall into in the fewest shots possible.

Features

Rough: an area of longer grass around the fairway, from where playing a shot is more difficult.

Water hazard: only found on some holes, if a ball falls into the water, the player receives one penalty shot and must drop their ball and play again from beside the 'hazard' but not nearer the hole.

Bunker: a sand-filled hole or 'hazard' designed to make the hole more difficult.

Out of bounds: if the ball lands or rolls here it cannot be played and the player receives a penalty stroke.

Par

Par is the pre-determined number of shots that an elite golfer should take to complete a single hole:

Par 3 - 130-250 yards

Par 4 - 251-445 yards

Par 5 - over 550 yards

 

Scoring Terms

Triple bogey: 3-over par

Double bogey: 2-over par

Bogey: 1-over par

Birdie: 1-under par

Eagle: 2-under par

Albatross: 3-under par (also called a "double eagle")

Score

Given in relation to the number of shots above or below par, with the winner taking the fewest shots to get his or her ball in each hole over the full competition.

Caddie

Each player is allowed a 'caddie', a non-playing assistant and source of valuable advice, to carry their golf bag which can hold up to 14 different clubs.

Clubs

Woods: for teeing off and longer, more powerful shots.

Irons: for controlled tee, long and mid-range shots.

Wedges: open-faced irons for bunker and short shots.

Putter: used on the greens, it is flat-faced to ensure the ball rolls smoothly along the surface.

Updates

Stats

Top Medalists

Men
USA
Henri Chandler Egan
1 1 0 2
USA
Francis Newton
0 1 1 2
USA
Burt McKinnie
0 1 1 2
Women
USA
Margaret Abbott
1 0 0 1
USA
Pauline Whittier
0 1 0 1
USA
Daria Pratt
0 0 1 1

Countries

Athletes

Athletes & Teams

Gender

Gender
Woman 49
Men 51
Women
Men

Age Range

Age Range
Under 15 0
16 - 20 7
21 - 25 21
26 - 30 33
31 - 40 29
Over 40 10
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