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A new world

Equestrian

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The only Olympic sport in which men and women compete against each other on a level playing field, equestrian has three disciplines: eventing, dressage and jumping, all of them with individual and team competitors.
Spectator's Guide - Equestrian

About

About

Aim of the game

There are three different disciplines – dressage, jumping and eventing – in which riders must avoid accumulating penalty points for errors

Why should you watch this?

You will be amazed by the harmony between riders and horses in events that demand great skill, courage and endurance

International Federation

FEI

Olympic debut

Paris 1900

Rules
  • Combination

    Combination

    Denotes the horse and rider together

  • Refusal

    Refusal

    When the horse refuses to jump an obstacle

  • Zero

    Zero

    A perfect round, when horse and rider accumulate no penalty points

Impress your friends

  • Dressage originated in ancient Greece when competing horses were required to move in a natural and disciplined manner

    Dressage originated in ancient Greece when competing horses were required to move in a natural and disciplined manner

  • Men began competing in dressage at the Olympic Games in Stockholm in 1912, but women were not able join in until the Helsinki 1952 Games

    Men began competing in dressage at the Olympic Games in Stockholm in 1912, but women were not able join in until the Helsinki 1952 Games

  • Jumping originated in the 18th century when a decision by the British Parliament enclosed some open countryside and fox hunters began jumping hedges and fences

    Jumping originated in the 18th century when a decision by the British Parliament enclosed some open countryside and fox hunters began jumping hedges and fences

  • The first official competition took place in Ireland in 1900, with the high jump, long jump and against the clock

    The first official competition took place in Ireland in 1900, with the high jump, long jump and against the clock

  • Eventing began in Europe, where soldiers wanted to test how their horses would react in different situations

    Eventing began in Europe, where soldiers wanted to test how their horses would react in different situations

  • On its Olympic debut at the Stockholm 1912 Games, the sport was still known as Cheval D'Arms due to its origins in the French military

    On its Olympic debut at the Stockholm 1912 Games, the sport was still known as Cheval D'Arms due to its origins in the French military

  • At the Paris 1924 Games, the Netherlands came back from last place at Antwerp 1920 to win gold in the individual and team eventing events

    At the Paris 1924 Games, the Netherlands came back from last place at Antwerp 1920 to win gold in the individual and team eventing events

  • At the Rome 1960 Games, Italian brothers Raimondo and Piero D'Inzeo won the gold and silver medals in jumping respectively, delighting the home crowd

    At the Rome 1960 Games, Italian brothers Raimondo and Piero D'Inzeo won the gold and silver medals in jumping respectively, delighting the home crowd

  • At the Beijing 2008 Games, the Netherlands’ Anky van Grunsven became the first rider to win three consecutive Olympic titles in the individual dressage event

    At the Beijing 2008 Games, the Netherlands’ Anky van Grunsven became the first rider to win three consecutive Olympic titles in the individual dressage event

  • Germany has established a dominant position in Olympic dressage, with 19 gold, 11 silver and nine bronze medals

    Germany has established a dominant position in Olympic dressage, with 19 gold, 11 silver and nine bronze medals

  • Germany's Hans Günter Winkler is the show jumper with the most Olympic gold medals (five) and the most Olympic medals (seven)

    Germany's Hans Günter Winkler is the show jumper with the most Olympic gold medals (five) and the most Olympic medals (seven)

  • Germany has won seven Olympic eventing gold medals and has the current Olympic (Michael Jung) and world (Sandra Auffarth) individual champions

    Germany has won seven Olympic eventing gold medals and has the current Olympic (Michael Jung) and world (Sandra Auffarth) individual champions

  • Equestrian is the only Olympic sport in which men and women compete on equal terms

    Equestrian is the only Olympic sport in which men and women compete on equal terms

  • Olympic horses work out on treadmills and receive massage, physiotherapy and acupuncture treatments

    Olympic horses work out on treadmills and receive massage, physiotherapy and acupuncture treatments

  • Top horses fly around the world on specially designed aeroplanes and have passports containing detailed physical descriptions and lists of vaccines taken

    Top horses fly around the world on specially designed aeroplanes and have passports containing detailed physical descriptions and lists of vaccines taken

Dressage

In a flat competition area, the rider must prompt the horse to perform movements such as steps, trots and canters, as well as freestyle routines choreographed to music. Individual and team competitions are held simultaneously, in three phases:

The Grand Prix: the horse must perform pre-determined movements. Six teams and 32 individual riders progress.

The Grand Prix Special: again the horse must perform pre-determined movements. This phase determines the team winners and 18 individual finalists.

The Grand Prix Freestyle: determines the individual medallists, based on their final displays, which are performed to music.

Seven judges assess the precision of the movements and allocate scores from zero to ten. Three faults eliminate the rider.

Jumping

Riders and horses must complete a course of 8-12 obstacles – including fences, water jumps and walls – as quickly as possible without committing faults, such as toppling rails, hitting the water and refusing obstacles. Some faults, such as a fall, result in elimination. The winner is the rider with the least number of points.

Individual: After three elimination rounds, the top 20 compete for medals in two final rounds, the A and B finals. The rider with the best combined score from these two rounds wins.

Team: Teams are limited to four riders and each team discards its worst result. The best eight from the first round reach the final. The final standings are based on scores from both rounds. In the event of a tie, a jump-off decides the winner.

Eventing

Considered the ‘equestrian triathlon’, eventing combines dressage, jumping and cross country. Riders compete on the same horse in all three disciplines, each of which has its own day.

A rider’s score (which counts for the individual and team events) is their total penalties from all three events, the lowest score winning. Teams have three or four riders but only the best three scores count.

In dressage, sometimes referred to as ‘horse ballet’, horse and rider must complete movements such as steps, trots and canters.

Cross-country takes place on a course with 40-45 obstacles – such as logs, water jumps and fences – which must be completed in a given time.

In jumping, horse and rider must clear 9-12 obstacles, with the top 25 competing in a second round.

Stats

Top Medalists

Men
ger
Reiner Klimke
6 0 2 8
GER
Hans Günther Winkler
5 1 1 7
usa
John Michael Plumb
2 4 0 6
Women
NED
Anky van Grunsven
3 5 1 9
GER
Isabell Werth
5 3 0 8
GER
Lisetott Linsenhoff
2 2 1 5